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Posts by: megmoseley

“Back on Murder”

I’ve always enjoyed reading mysteries with well-rounded characterizations and themes that go deeper than the simple “Whodunnit?” questions.  For instance, James Lee Burke’s Dave Robicheaux stories are memorable not only for Burke’s  inimitable voice but also for the eternal questions that he raises in stories that are ostensibly just about murders on a Louisiana bayou. J. Mark Bertrand’s Back on…

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Happy endings

I’ve been writing and thinking about some heavy topics lately, most of them related to the issues that come up my novel.  The revised manuscript is in my editor’s hands, and I’m taking a short break from writing. But not from reading.  Ever.  At the request of my pastor’s wife, I’m about to dive into some stories that revolve around…

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Freedom for Quivering Daughters

True confession:  I’m a Bible-believing Christian, but I have deliberately broken the laws of the land.  I have engaged in illegal homeschooling.  I didn’t have a teaching certificate in a state that required one.  That might not sound too radical, but we lived in fear of losing custody of our children until Michigan relaxed its laws. Maybe it was civil…

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The writer’s spouse’s life

Seems like a writer’s life is always, always sidetracked by writerly imaginings. There I was at a little mom-and-pop restaurant with my hubby, enjoying a Sunday morning omelet.  But oh, no, I couldn’t just engage in a normal conversation with my long-suffering spouse.  I had to spy on the folks at a nearby table. There were five of them, three…

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Memorial Day and a flimsy blanket

“Those poor boys in the trenches in Europe, trying to stay warm with these flimsy blankets!” My mother said that, years ago, about an Army-issue wool blanket that once belonged to her uncle, who fought in World War I.  For me, the blanket became a tangible symbol of some of the hardships that soldiers face. I’m not sure how Uncle…

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Homeschooling: sensible and not so sensible

I may be a “graduate” homeschool mom, with my kids grown and out of school, but I still read Karen Campbell’s “That Mom” blog of encouragement for homeschool mothers.  Her current post on minimalist influence is outstanding.  It gets to the roots of how homeschooling should work. As I told Karen in my comment, I wish I’d known her years…

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Keith Green and the Jesus Movement

A Keith Green movie is in the works.  (Thanks to Paul Wilkinson for posting links to information and discussion.) Keith Green and his music and his Last Days Ministries were an integral part of the Jesus Movement in California.  I lived a bit north of Southern California where so much of the music started, but the music and the movement…

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Wallowing in gratitude

When we lived in Michigan, our older kids raised pigs for 4-H.  For five or six years, every spring meant an excursion to a local pig farm to buy one piglet per child, plus one for the freezer.  By “piglet,” I do not mean a baby-sized infant pig, all pinkness and innocence. I mean a muddy, muscular, opinionated beast, weighing…

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The latest from my to-be-read pile

I love my library’s online catalog.  I ransack it from my own home, request books, and pick them up when I’m notified via email that they’ve come in.  I’m like a kid in a candy store, but the candy is free.  And I have little self-control. Some of the titles from my latest haul: Infinite Jest (David Foster Wallace), Major…

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Hillary McFarland’s “Quivering Daughters”

Hillary McFarland gave me a sneak preview of her upcoming non-fiction book, Quivering Daughters, and I loved it.  The book is a must-read for anyone who homeschools, rubs shoulders with homeschoolers, or is curious about hyperpatriarchy or “Quiverfull” families like the Duggars of TLC’s “19 Kids and Counting.” I’m pro-homeschooling; we homeschooled our own kids.  By the grace of God,…

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